Call Us Now 908.735.5161

Majors Law Firm P.C.

Providing Skilled Legal Expertise
for 135 Years

Wage Theft Act – the Latest Law Impacting Employers in NJ

August 21st, 2019 | Written by Leslie A. Parikh, Esq.

The New Jersey Wage Theft Act (WTA) is the most recent legislation following on the heels of several other laws significantly impacting New Jersey employers.  The legislation was passed on August 6, 2019 and will toughen penalties for an employer’s failure to pay wages owed to workers. The law applies to traditional wage and hour violations such as the failure to pay minimum wage, failure to pay overtime, etc., and it also extends to employee benefits. 

Full Read

Employers: Asking Job Candidates About Salary History Will Soon Be Illegal in NJ

August 9th, 2019 | Written by Leslie A. Parikh, Esq.

With the signing of Bill A1094 into law on July 25, 2019, New Jersey has followed in the footsteps of several other states by prohibiting employers from inquiring about job applicants’ prior earning history. The new law goes into effect on January 1, 2020, and pertains not only to wages, but also other employment-related compensation and benefits.

Full Read

Exhaustion of Remedies No Longer Required in Constitutional Takings Cases

July 12th, 2019 | Written by Leslie A. Parikh, Esq.

In Knick v. Township of Scott, Pa. (No. 17-647), decided June 21, 2019, the U.S. Supreme Court overruled the longstanding precedent set forth in Williamson County v. Hamilton Bank (1985), which required a plaintiff bringing a claim under the Civil Rights Act of 1871 (Section 1983) for unconstitutional taking of private property to first exhaust state and local remedies.

Full Read

New Jersey’s Expanded Medical Marijuana Law Presents Serious Implications for Employers

July 9th, 2019 | Written by Leslie A. Parikh, Esq.

New Jersey’s marijuana legislation has been in a constant state of flux for more than a year. Prior to July 2, 2019, New Jersey’s medical marijuana law allowed individuals who received a valid recommendation from a physician to purchase, possess and consume cannabis, but failed to provide any protection for medical marijuana users in the employment arena. In fact, the New Jersey Compassionate Use Medical Marijuana Act, N.J.S.A. 24:61-1, et seq. (CUMMA), specifically did not require an employer to accommodate a medical marijuana user. That all changed on July 2, 2019, when Governor Phil Murphy signed a bill that expanded the State’s medical marijuana program in significant ways.

Full Read

Divorce and Equitable Distribution of Restricted Stock

July 1st, 2019 | Written by Diana N. Fredericks, Esq.

In one of my recent divorce cases, the following question arose:  “Would a portion of restricted stock, which vests after the date of the complaint for divorce, be subject to equitable distribution, if the vesting is contingent upon post-complaint employment efforts?”

Full Read

Is the Cost of a Child’s Car Considered Child Support in NJ?

June 24th, 2019 | Written by Diana N. Fredericks, Esq.

Clients often ask if the cost of a child's car is considered child support in NJ.  No, the expenses for the purchase of a child’s car and any associated costs are NOT considered to be part of basic child support under the NJ Child Support Guidelines.

Full Read

A Moral Obligation Versus a Legal Obligation

May 30th, 2019 | Written by William J. Rudnik, Esq.

As a divorce attorney, I often have clients who question whether their spouses should or should not do something.  This may have to do with the finances or the children, but it is a common question.  Many times, the answer has to do with the difference between a moral obligation and a legal obligation. 

Full Read

Taxes & Divorce - Ten Tips to Consider

May 20th, 2019 | Written by Diana N. Fredericks, Esq.

The new tax law changes (Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017) expire in 2025. This needs to be a consideration in drafting divorce agreements, as these changes may affect what is agreed upon now.

Full Read

Why Must I Compromise to Finalize My Divorce?

May 7th, 2019 | Written by Diana N. Fredericks, Esq.

Approximately 97% of divorce cases settle.  Settlement can come easily at the early stages of a case or on the eve of trial, but it is more likely than not to occur at some point in every divorce case.  For settlement to occur, BOTH sides need to compromise.  It is not uncommon for both sides to feel that they have “given in” or compromised more than the other.  And, of course, there are certain instances where one party may be more reasonable or willing to compromise in order to conclude the divorce (or to finalize a matter).   

Full Read

Right-to-Die Law Passed in NJ

April 18th, 2019 | Written by Daniel S. Makoski, Esq.

The Aid in Dying for the Terminally Ill Act was signed into law on April 12, 2019. The law, which goes into effect on August 1, 2019, allows a terminally ill patient to make a request to receive medication for self-administration that will hasten death.

Full Read