Majors Law Firm P.C.

Providing Skilled Legal Expertise
for 133 Years

Lyme Disease Is a Disability Entitled to Protection in the Workplace

September 7th, 2016 | Written by Arthur D. Fialk, Esq.

A recent Appellate Division case, Cook v. Gregory Press, Inc., determined that Lyme disease qualifies as a disability under the Law Against Discrimination (LAD). 

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Avoiding Common Mistakes in Your Employee Handbook

July 7th, 2016 | Written by Leslie A. Parikh, Esq.

A poorly written, outdated, or inconsistent employee manual can hurt your company and lead to potential litigation down the line.  The most common mistakes to avoid are the following:

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NJ Supreme Court Expands Definition of Marital Status Under the LAD

June 29th, 2016 | Written by William H. Pandos, Esq.

The New Jersey Supreme Court recently issued an important interpretation of New Jersey’s “Law Against Discrimination” (LAD), of which all New Jersey employers should be aware. 

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How Do the New DOL Overtime Rules Affect My Business?

June 1st, 2016 | Written by Deborah B. Rosenthal, Esq.

On May 18, 2016, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) announced a final rule regarding overtime wage payment qualifications for the “white collar exemptions” under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). Covered employers must comply with this rule by December 1, 2016.

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Supreme Court Rules on First Amendment Protection for Demoted Paterson Police Officer

May 11th, 2016 | Written by Deborah B. Rosenthal, Esq. and Kelly A. Lichtenstein, Esq.

In Heffernan v. City of Paterson, a recently decided U.S. Supreme Court case, a government official demoted an employee because he believed that the employee supported a particular non-incumbent candidate for mayor. The Court had to decide if the First Amendment prohibited the government from demoting the employee based on the government’s perception that the employee supported the non-incumbent politician. The Supreme Court held that yes, it did.

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Are Companies Required to Pay Summer Interns?

April 20th, 2016 | Written by Deborah B. Rosenthal, Esq.

Many companies hire interns over the summer, and mistakenly believe the interns do not have to be paid.  Since these companies are providing high school or college students with valuable work experiences that hopefully will help the students find paying jobs upon graduation, company management sometimes thinks that the experience is sufficient “payment” for the work provided.  However, depending on what these summer interns are doing, the company may need to pay them at least minimum wage. 

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When Can an Employer Require a Fitness-for-Duty Exam?

February 25th, 2016 | Written by Deborah B. Rosenthal, Esq.

Recently, the Appellate Division found that an employer wrongfully required an employee to undergo a fitness-for-duty examination after receiving an anonymous letter expressing concerns about the employee’s mental condition.

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When Does “HO-HO-HO” Become “WOE, WOE, WOE”? Top 10 Ways to Prevent Your Company Holiday Party from Turning into Potential Litigation

December 8th, 2015 | Written by Deborah B. Rosenthal, Esq.

While many companies sponsor holiday parties, the consumption of alcohol, coupled with dancing and a casual environment, can lead to various types of possible internal complaints and lawsuits. Here are ten tips to help your company avoid litigation:

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Protecting Your Company From Harassment & Discrimination Lawsuits

October 13th, 2015 | Written by Deborah B. Rosenthal, Esq.

In Hobson v. Tremmel, the court dismissed the plaintiff’s complaint against her employer for discrimination. Her complaint alleged a hostile work environment, sexual harassment and retaliation. Recently the Appellate Division upheld this dismissal. In upholding the dismissal, the Appellate Division pointed out the following:

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Avoiding Hostile Work Environment & Sexual Harassment Liability

August 12th, 2015 | Written by Leslie A. Parikh, Esq.

A recent opinion by the New Jersey Appellate Division, Jones v. Dr. Pepper Snapple Group, confirms that employers must take proactive measures to protect employees from being subjected to a hostile work environment. In Jones, the Court was asked to address whether the plaintiff, a temporary employee who worked as a machine operator at the defendant’s manufacturing facility from March 2010 to October 2011, and subsequently as a permanent employee for a short period in early 2012, could maintain a sexual harassment hostile work environment claim against the defendants.

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How the DOL’s Proposals For Exemptions to Overtime May Affect Your Business

July 20th, 2015 | Written by Deborah B. Rosenthal, Esq.

Under current Department of Labor (DOL) regulations, employees who are called “managers” are exempt from overtime if they make more than $455 a week or $23,660 per year, even if they perform routine, non-managerial tasks. On June 29, 2015, President Obama announced that he wants to double that threshold to $970/ week, or $50,440 per year, in 2016.

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Pregnancy is Now a Protected Class Under NJ Law

June 18th, 2015 | Written by Deborah B. Rosenthal, Esq.

New Jersey recently enacted the Pregnant Worker’s Fairness Act (ANJPWFA) as an amendment to the New Jersey Law Against Discrimination (LAD). This amendment explicitly prohibits discrimination based on pregnancy and requires employers to provide reasonable accommodations to pregnant employees in the workplace, when the accommodation is recommended by the employee’s physician.

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Snow Days and Exempt Employees

May 1st, 2015 | Written by Deborah B. Rosenthal, Esq.

Spring is finally here…your company has made it through the harsh winter of 2015! Did your employees who are exempt from overtime miss any work due to the weather? Did you deduct their salary or paid time off for missing work? Before the next winter begins, you should know the Department of Labor’s rules regarding deducting an exempt employee’s salary and paid time off.

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Exempt vs. Non-Exempt: Avoiding Wage Violations

April 13th, 2015 | Written by Leslie A. Parikh, Esq.

Most employees are classified as either “exempt” or “non-exempt” for purposes of New Jersey and Federal wage laws.  Salary and type of work are significant factors in evaluating the exempt or non-exempt status of an employee. 

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Employers Beware…Have You “Banned the Box”?

April 1st, 2015 | Written by Deborah B. Rosenthal, Esq.

As of March 1, 2015, all public and private employers that have 15 or more employees are now prohibited from asking a job applicant about his or her criminal record until after the first job interview, unless the applicant voluntarily discloses such information. Governor Christie signed the   “Opportunity to Compete Act” last year, but the Act’s requirements did not begin until March 1 of this year.

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Defending Sexual Harassment Claims Against Employers

March 10th, 2015 | Written by Deborah B. Rosenthal, Esq.

On Feb. 11, 2015, the New Jersey Supreme Court issued Aguas v. New Jersey, a case that has significant implications for employers in sexual harassment cases, and raised the bar on what a Plaintiff needs to demonstrate to win the case against his or her employer. 

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Why Performance Reviews are Important

February 20th, 2015 | Written by Deborah B. Rosenthal, Esq.

The NJ Superior Court Appellate Division recently reiterated the importance of employers conducting thorough and complete performance reviews of employees.

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